"4 Requirements for a Bikeable Community"  — cool graphic on from good.

"4 Requirements for a Bikeable Community"  — cool graphic on from good.

The Atlanta Transit Agency’s Big Plan to Convert Parking Lots into Housing
The following is a re-post from thisiscitylab - Darin 
Like many U.S. transit agencies, MARTA has long struggled to secure reliable funding. The agency doesn’t receive money from the state, instead relying on sales tax income from participating counties, making it vulnerable to big economic swings. After the Great Recession, MARTA reduced staff and service while increasing fares, and when an effort to expand the revenue base failed in a 2012 referendum, the agency found itself facing a $33 million deficit.
So MARTA got creative. Keith Parker, who took over the agency in late 2012, implemented a transformation initiative that involved, among other things, a new planning strategy emphasizing TOD. In spring of 2013, Parker announced that MARTA would have five station-area projects underway within two years; to date the agency has identified developers for three projects, targeted several stations for the final two projects, and expects groundbreaking on some of the buildings as early as next year.
Enabling the projects is MARTA’s recognition that certain stations have devoted too much space to parking—an insight that several transit agencies around the world now share. At King Memorial Station, an urban station that Rhein says doesn’t make sense to reach by car, the agency owned four acres of parking lots adjacent to the station that it didn’t even use. Instead, the space had been subleased to a nearby hospital.
READ MORE…
[Image: Tim Adams/Flickr]

The Atlanta Transit Agency’s Big Plan to Convert Parking Lots into Housing

The following is a re-post from thisiscitylab - Darin

Like many U.S. transit agencies, MARTA has long struggled to secure reliable funding. The agency doesn’t receive money from the state, instead relying on sales tax income from participating counties, making it vulnerable to big economic swings. After the Great Recession, MARTA reduced staff and service while increasing fares, and when an effort to expand the revenue base failed in a 2012 referendum, the agency found itself facing a $33 million deficit.

So MARTA got creative. Keith Parker, who took over the agency in late 2012, implemented a transformation initiative that involved, among other things, a new planning strategy emphasizing TOD. In spring of 2013, Parker announced that MARTA would have five station-area projects underway within two years; to date the agency has identified developers for three projects, targeted several stations for the final two projects, and expects groundbreaking on some of the buildings as early as next year.

Enabling the projects is MARTA’s recognition that certain stations have devoted too much space to parking—an insight that several transit agencies around the world now share. At King Memorial Station, an urban station that Rhein says doesn’t make sense to reach by car, the agency owned four acres of parking lots adjacent to the station that it didn’t even use. Instead, the space had been subleased to a nearby hospital.

READ MORE…

[Image: Tim Adams/Flickr]

Project for bike lanes on Peachtree Rd. stalled by opposition in Buckhead

image

The push back

Atlanta City Councilwoman Mary Norwood has decided to back a group of bike-lane-phobic residents who oppose adding a new bike lane on Peachtree Road in north Atlanta’s Buckhead area. Buckhead View has the story (great coverage, btw).

In a nutshell, a project to improve pedestrian safety via road diets (and more) and to add a bike lane in Buckhead’s Peachtree Road corridor — where there has been an incredible boom in offices and apartments in recent years — is now stalled due to neighborhood opposition.

Key quotes from the opposition:

  • From a Buckhead resident: “It’s scary to put a 17-pound bicycle up against a 4,000-pound car.”
  • From Mary Norwood (in Yoda-esque phrasing): “The idea of bicycle lanes and the road diet I am opposed to.”
  • David Allman, chairman of the Buckhead CID board: “Our first and foremost priority is addressing existing and future automobile traffic.”

The push-back on these bike lanes shows a lack of vision for this section of Atlanta. Peachtree Road is Buckhead’s most promising artery for transformation into a functional, multi-modal ideal for a new generation of residents, workers, shoppers, visitor, students, etc.

Fighting the fears: bike lanes won’t hurt Buckhead

Fortunately for bicycle advocates, the data for adding a lane here is on our side.

For one thing, arguments that a bike lane might hurt business are wrong. Not only do bike lanes not hurt retail stores, but studies show that cyclists actually spend more money than drivers.

As for real estate values, bike-friendly housing is in growing demand in the US.

And when it comes to traffic congestion, the effect of taking away a car lane and adding a bike lane might not be what you think. Earlier this year, a traffic expert named Rock Miller (what a name!) argued that recent successes in other cities prove that congestion could be relieved by removing a car lane on a busy road in Calgary and replacing it with a cycle track:

Miller says…he has seen similar cycle tracks installed in both New York and Chicago in very similar situations — on busy downtown streets with few alternative routes for cars, in cities that are much more dense than Calgary — and after the lanes were installed, traffic started to actually move faster down those roads.

Keeping an eye on the future: let progress happen

In 2002, a report from the Atlanta Regional Commission — the  Buckhead Action Plan — outlined a great vision for Buckhead’s future that addressed transportation issues in a sustainable, forward-thinking way:

The vision for Buckhead includes a high-density, mixed-use core that forms a destination node surrounding the Buckhead MARTA Station and Peachtree Road. The high-density core ranges from Piedmont Road to Peachtree-Dunwoody with street front retail, landscaped pedestrian paths and dedicated bicycle routes.

It sounds just as good in 2014 as it did then. The pedestrian streetscape has been improved significantly here. In many key spots, Buckhead is a much nicer place to walk around than it was 10 years ago. Keep moving forward with this plan boldly! With an incredible amount of residential density building here via new apartments, this is no time to settle for a job half done.

Rather than prioritizing the movement of cars on Peachtree above all else — taking a step back in time — Buckhead would do well to remain committed to the established goal for for a greater diversity in transportation modes and tackle congestion by reducing the number of trips in single-occupancy cars. A bike lane on Peachtree would help.

Follow the money: cyclists spend it

And if “greater diversity in transportation modes” doesn’t rock your boat, how about money? Apparently, people on bikes spend it; and lanes bring them and their wallets into stores at a fast clip:

A recent report from the New York City Department of Transportation found significant evidence of the economic benefits of bike infrastructure…retail sales on Ninth Avenue are up 49 percent since the street’s protected bike lanes were installed – that’s 16 times the area growth rate.

My armchair-urbanist analysis of the situation: this project to put in a bike lane and pedestrian improvements on Peachtree Road in Buckhead could be a catalyst for creating public spaces there that are more vibrant and less car-dependent — more focused on serving people who are exploring the streets on foot & pedal rather than passing through them in a car. It would be sad to see this opportunity slip away.

"Atlanta’s population has increased 6.6 percent since 2010, more than twice the growth in the rest of Georgia. Many of the arrivals are young professionals drawn by companies moving back into the city, including Coca-Cola and AT&T. Jobs and investment used to head for the suburbs. Not anymore."

A Reversal in Georgia’s Long War With Atlanta | 7/17/14, Bloomberg Businessweek (h/t Curbed Atlanta)

Tags: atlanta

My Downtown Atlanta Friday

Top, left: I love how often I see bicyclists on Downtown streets now. It was a rare sight up until a couple of years ago.

Top, right: Watching the new GSU law school building rise up, it’s becoming apparent how much it will change the view from Woodruff Park. It will add a new architectural style to the existing diversity in the skyline.

Bottom: My building had it’s seasonal progressive party tonight, where three units open up to host guests for 45 minutes each. It’s always fun. We’ve lived in a couple of intown neighborhoods before this one and Downtown has the best neighbors. I took this pic from the 13th floor.

The Goat Farm Arts Center, Atlanta

Tucked away near the freight rail lines of northwest Atlanta, the Goat Farm Arts Center is an incredible spot filled with nature, decaying factory buildings, animals and — most importantly — art.

You can read about the history of the site here. In a nutshell: a cotton-gin factory was built here in the 1880s and it remained active into the early 20th century; during World War II, the site was used to manufacture ammunition and mortars.  

A Creative Loafing article from 2010 tells the story of the site’s conversion to an arts space by Robert Haywood, who purchased it in the 1970s and who was: “a drawling, likeable character who fiercely guarded his property — and, by extension, the privacy of the up-and-coming sculptors, musicians, painters and photographers who flocked to its studio spaces.”

I visited this week to see a very cool monthly show called Natural Selection that features comedy, theater, poetry readings, music and more from a variety of Atlanta artists. Don’t let the decayed exteriors of the buildings fool you; the interior performance area was decked out with lights, sound, stage — all the necessities.

While I was there I took a few snaps of the property, including an amazing art piece composed of file cabinets, and the view of Downtown and the freight rail tracks leading to it. 

EDIT: I received an email letting me know that the wonderful filing cabinet piece is the work of artist David Baerwalde.

"The appeal of autonomous cars carries the risk of adding to urban sprawl and pollution as they may encourage commuters to travel farther to work…“U.S. history shows that anytime you make driving easier, there seems to be this inexhaustible desire to live further from things” [says Ken Laberteaux, senior principal scientist for Toyota North America]"

Automated Cars May Boost Fuel Use, Toyota Scientist Says | Bloomberg.com, Jul 16, 2014