ATL Urbanist

Sep 01

Beautiful clouds this morning, Downtown Atlanta

Beautiful clouds this morning, Downtown Atlanta

Aug 31

Autumn leaves falling in Piedmont Park today despite the very summery heat and humidity #Atlanta

Autumn leaves falling in Piedmont Park today despite the very summery heat and humidity #Atlanta

Aug 29

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Aug 28

Bikes on Broad Street in Downtown Atlanta. We’re happy that GSU is back in session — the students bring so much street life.

Bikes on Broad Street in Downtown Atlanta. We’re happy that GSU is back in session — the students bring so much street life.

Housing and transportation costs — as a percentage of income — are higher in sprawling metros like Atlanta
As a companion to my recent post “The affordability swindle: why living in sunbelt sprawl actually costs more" — here’s a great graphic from a post on Reuters’ Data Dive blog titled "The expense of sprawl.”
It shows the percentage of household income (that’s the horizontal metric) that’s spent on average, within each of these metro areas, on a combo of housing and transportation costs. And yes, it says “cities” but it means metros — pet peeve of mine. The blue part is housing and the green part is transpo.
Take a look at where sprawling places like Atlanta and Phoenix fall on the chart. On average, people in Metro Atlanta spend a higher percentage of wages on housing/transpo costs than people in more compact, walkable places like NYC.
Of course, you have to take into account that average wages in NYC are higher. But is it possible that those high wages are possible as a result of some innate benefit to local economies brought on by that compact, walkable environment? Could be.

Housing and transportation costs — as a percentage of income — are higher in sprawling metros like Atlanta

As a companion to my recent post “The affordability swindle: why living in sunbelt sprawl actually costs more" — here’s a great graphic from a post on Reuters’ Data Dive blog titled "The expense of sprawl.

It shows the percentage of household income (that’s the horizontal metric) that’s spent on average, within each of these metro areas, on a combo of housing and transportation costs. And yes, it says “cities” but it means metros — pet peeve of mine. The blue part is housing and the green part is transpo.

Take a look at where sprawling places like Atlanta and Phoenix fall on the chart. On average, people in Metro Atlanta spend a higher percentage of wages on housing/transpo costs than people in more compact, walkable places like NYC.

Of course, you have to take into account that average wages in NYC are higher. But is it possible that those high wages are possible as a result of some innate benefit to local economies brought on by that compact, walkable environment? Could be.

Aug 27

The Flatiron Building this evening, Downtown Atlanta

The Flatiron Building this evening, Downtown Atlanta

“About 300 kids are hurt daily in car accidents; an average of three are killed that way every day. Yet I don’t see police pulling parents over and locking them up whenever they see someone in a car seat. But playing on the monkey bars without Mommy nearby? Book ’em!” — Why I let my children walk to the corner store — and why other parents should, too | Washington Post, 8/25/14