ATL Urbanist

Sep 16

It really felt like autumn this morning, with the cool air, cloudy sky and changing leaves in Centennial Park. Ahhh. After a particularly humid summer, I’m ready for weather that lets me walk and bike around without immediately glistening from perspiration. Bring on the cooler temperatures. And bring on the gourds.

It really felt like autumn this morning, with the cool air, cloudy sky and changing leaves in Centennial Park. Ahhh. After a particularly humid summer, I’m ready for weather that lets me walk and bike around without immediately glistening from perspiration. Bring on the cooler temperatures. And bring on the gourds.

“Over the past five years, the city attracted over $700 million in private investment through InvestAtlanta, and Atlanta added nearly $100 million to its cash reserves…But some boats aren’t rising with the tide. Children in Atlanta have only a 4% chance of upward mobility, and Atlanta has the highest income inequality in the United States.” — Why Atlanta is ripe for innovation | 9/13/2014, Money.CNN.com

The economic benefit of reducing emissions with compact cities

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There are many reasons to get excited about Atlanta’s current trend of good, sustainable urban development. Visions for the Atlanta Beltline (above), MARTA’s transit-oriented developments, expanded bicycle infrastructure, new greenspaces — these can appeal to people on mutliple levels.

But I admit that I sometimes wonder if I’m preaching to the choir and alienating others with my references to the purely environmental good of building our people habitats in a more compact, connected form — for the sake of sparing land for nature. It’s a tree-hugging sentiment that is close to my heart but may be a stretch for others not already among the converted.

So I was happy to read in Fortune magazine, of all places, a news item about the economic benefit of preserving unbuilt land and growing our urban places in a more compact, walkable form that can be served well by transit. This is the kind of argument that can appeal to a broader audience. Read about it here: Why fighting climate change may help the economy, not hurt it

Compact cities save forests

The article focuses on two recent reports, both of them detailing the economic & environmental value of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, showing that:

…reducing greenhouse gas emissions can actually result in a stronger and more vibrant economy in the United States and across the globe.

The report that interests me most is from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, a group made up of “24 former heads of states and finance ministers.”

Their report calls for:

building “more connected and compact” urban cities driven by public transport, halting deforestation and restoring at least 500 million hectares of lost or degraded forests and agricultural lands by 2030, and developing energy systems more reliant on renewables and less dependent on coal.

Putting a dollar amount on good urbanism

A look at the report’s details reveals these nuggets of economic goodness:

There’s also an excellent quote from the former Mayor of Barcelona, Joan Clos on the importance of good urban planning in achieving these outcomes: “…there will be no solution to global prosperity and climate change without good urbanization. And good urbanization does not come by chance — it comes by design.”

This is all very common-sense stuff for urbanists already on board with the widespread good of eco-urbanism. But for those who have trouble finding the innate environmental good in walkable cities and protected nature, know that there’s a very concrete economic benefit as well. 

Image from the Atlanta Beltline website

Sep 15

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Sep 14

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Sep 13

Freaky morning weather: a strange but beautiful mix of bright sunrise and heavy fog this morning in Atlanta.

Freaky morning weather: a strange but beautiful mix of bright sunrise and heavy fog this morning in Atlanta.

Sep 12

Curb Market, Atlanta — then and now. 

These great photos come from the Grindhouse Killer Burgers Facebook page. The top is the GKB booth at the Curb Market in Downtown Atlanta modern day. The bottom is the same space as it was in, I’m guessing, the 1940s. 

The Atlanta Municipal Market is a city owned building that was built as a market space in 1924. The market is currently operated by the Sweet Auburn Curb Market organization.

Curb Market, Atlanta — then and now.

These great photos come from the Grindhouse Killer Burgers Facebook page. The top is the GKB booth at the Curb Market in Downtown Atlanta modern day. The bottom is the same space as it was in, I’m guessing, the 1940s.

The Atlanta Municipal Market is a city owned building that was built as a market space in 1924. The market is currently operated by the Sweet Auburn Curb Market organization.