"If biking and walking infrastructure is presented as some kind of recreational amenity, it will be the first thing cut the next time budgets tighten. Successful biking and walking infrastructure is not recreation but transportation. It is also an extremely high returning investment, one that not only disproportionately grows the tax base but allows local money to stay within the community longer."

Stupid is as Stupid does | Strong Towns Blog, 4/14/2014

#atlanta

#atlanta

Tags: atlanta

"We want to create an environment where people want to walk in, want to bike in and want to take transit in. And that is not a sea of surface parking lots."

Parking Lots Demolished in Cities’ Revenue Bid as Driving Wanes | Business Week, 4/10/14

"Paving decisions" in Atlanta

The top image is taken from a 1919 aerial map of Atlanta, at the intersection of Trinity Avenue and Forsyth Street. It’s typical of the compact land use of pre-automobile cities. The bottom photo shows what we have in that spot today.

I shaded in blue what is pretty much the only set of structures left intact after the surroundings were obliterated by the desire to build parking lots. 

How did this happen? The answer comes via a quote posted by citymaus :

In their headlong search for modernity through mobility, American urbanites made a decision to destroy the living environments of nineteenth-century neighborhoods by converting their gathering places into traffic jams, their playgrounds into motorways, and their shopping places into elongated parking lots. These paving decisions effectively made obsolete many of urban America’s older neighborhoods.

What isn’t answered in the quote is this question: why does this urban decay linger? What is preventing us from turning this transit-connected space (that’s a MARTA station on the lower right) with gridded streets into something more valuable, efficient, and uplifting for the city? 

Downtown residents have been wondering for many years, but there are no simple answers and very little initiative seems to exist in city government to find a solution. This, despite the millions of dollars that were spent to build the rail station and the great potential for revenue from transit-connected development.

Quote source: “Transforming the Use of Urban Space – Look at the Revolution in Street Pavements, 1880-1924” Journal of Urban History, 5(3)

EDIT: only after the post has been reblogged almost 100 times do I notice a typo. I originally had the map pegged as 1909. I’ve corrected it to 1919 above. Here’s the source. h/t kvnryn via reddit

"[Planning Professor Reid] Ewing tracked fewer fatal car crashes in counties with less sprawl. More densely populated counties actually had more car crashes (more traffic), but fatalities were lower. So a person living in Walker County, Georgia, is three times as likely to be killed in a car crash than a person living in Denver County, Colorado."

Urban Sprawl: Get Fat, Stay Poor, And Die In Car Crashes : a new report on metro density says it straight: quality of life improves in compact cities | Fastcodesign.com, 4/7/14

Tags: atlanta

Atlanta Streetcar Construction
Here we have a streetcar platform under construction alongside Woodruff Park in Atlanta. Overhead, workers hang wires that will power the cars. And way in the background, you can just kinda see the new GSU law school under construction. Downtown on the rise.
Speaking of, streetcar director Tim Borchers spoke this week about the way that Atlanta is using Portland’s streetcar as an example. In Portland, “More than half of the city’s new development in the last decade has taken place within one block of the line; 10,000 housing units have been developed within three blocks.”
I have no expectation of Atlanta’s line seeing quite that level of success, given that we have so many competing areas of urban density in the city. But we’ll surely see some significant gains in development near the route, and I can’t wait for it to happen.

Atlanta Streetcar Construction

Here we have a streetcar platform under construction alongside Woodruff Park in Atlanta. Overhead, workers hang wires that will power the cars. And way in the background, you can just kinda see the new GSU law school under construction. Downtown on the rise.

Speaking of, streetcar director Tim Borchers spoke this week about the way that Atlanta is using Portland’s streetcar as an example. In Portland, “More than half of the city’s new development in the last decade has taken place within one block of the line; 10,000 housing units have been developed within three blocks.”

I have no expectation of Atlanta’s line seeing quite that level of success, given that we have so many competing areas of urban density in the city. But we’ll surely see some significant gains in development near the route, and I can’t wait for it to happen.