The view from Fairlie-Poplar, Atlanta

Top: clouds this morning
Bottom: clouds this evening

"Seattle’s population grew 2.8 percent in the year ending July 2013…The rise reflects a new urbanism that’s made places like Denver and Atlanta more appealing, especially for those who can’t afford a house or prefer pedestrian-friendly spaces to suburbs."

— I had to share this quote from a Bloomberg.com article  about Seattle. It’s pretty cool to read the words “urbanism,” “pedestrian-friendly” and “Atlanta” in the same sentence in the national press.

The view this evening from the rooftop deck of Six Feet Under in Midtown Atlanta.

The view this evening from the rooftop deck of Six Feet Under in Midtown Atlanta.

"Prior to World War II, every city in America was built for easy walking and biking. In fact, the idea of living in a walkable place is nothing radical. What was radical was the program we undertook to build an entirely new type of human life…Americans have grown up fully immersed in the car culture, not knowing alternatives — and that’s a problem."

Finding Freedom in the Walkable Neighborhood | This Big City, 7/7/2014

The moon peeking from between two buildings, Downtown Atlanta

The moon peeking from between two buildings, Downtown Atlanta

Tags: atlanta

Walking Atlanta

What do two Downtown Atlanta parents do on a Saturday while their kid is away? A 6.5 mile walking & drinking tour of the city, of course! Here are photos from our trip, along with a map. (We ran out of steam in Grant Park and took MARTA home.)

Tips for a long summer walking tour of Atlanta:

  • Find the shady side of the street. The summer sunlight is nice in small doses only.
  • Know where the nearest cold beverage is. I recommend Lotta Frutta smoothies, the water fountains at the Carter Center, Hennepin Saison at Folk Art and the house brewed beer at Wrecking Bar
  • Know when to give in and take MARTA. Those trains & buses are air conditioned.
  • Don’t walk on Memorial Drive. No shade, crappy sidewalks.

Happy walking, Atlanta!

"I see us entering an era where distinctions between city and suburb will disappear. Suburbs will begin to look like cities physically, while cities will begin to look like suburbs demographically. Suburbs that stand to benefit in the upcoming era will be ones that urbanize, and attract a group that effectively repudiates the lifestyle of previous generations."

It’s Getting Harder And Harder To Tell Cities And Suburbs Apart | Business Insider, 7/7/2014