Fairlie-Poplar was bustling today. This random photo I snapped of the corner of Fairlie & Poplar Streets, while on my way to lunch at Slice, shows the scene. It looks the a staged still from a movie that takes place in a busy big-city neighborhood. But it’s a real slice of life in our home. This week marks our four year anniversary of living in Downtown Atlanta. Still loving it.

Fairlie-Poplar was bustling today. This random photo I snapped of the corner of Fairlie & Poplar Streets, while on my way to lunch at Slice, shows the scene. It looks the a staged still from a movie that takes place in a busy big-city neighborhood. But it’s a real slice of life in our home.

This week marks our four year anniversary of living in Downtown Atlanta. Still loving it.

Sounds of the city at night.

I had a nice walk on Peachtree Street last night, from Publik in Midtown to our Downtown home. It’s a trip I take regularly and enjoy because it gives me an opportunity to pass through an assortment of spaces and activities — one that provides the kind of rich sensory mix you only find in a big city.

Some day I want to record the sounds of that walk. The cars buzzing by, the chatter of crowds in restaurants, noisy men making their way into the Pines Street homeless shelter, the hum of movement on the interstate as you walk over it, a crying baby in a stroller being pushed into a hotel…it’s a wonderful diversity.

And the sounds come in waves, with pauses in the middle as you walk past quiet buildings like the beautiful Imperial Hotel, above (not actually a hotel, btw), and the dead silence from empty structures such as a long-abandoned Medical Arts building.

Making a recording of that is on my to-do list, but for now I’m happy to experience it.

Corner of Peachtree and Ponce, Atlanta

(BTW, if you ever visit Atlanta or if you’re a new resident: we pronounce the street Ponce de Leon Avenue with the middle part as “D’Lee-un;” but usually we just say “Ponce.”)

Corner of Peachtree and Ponce, Atlanta

(BTW, if you ever visit Atlanta or if you’re a new resident: we pronounce the street Ponce de Leon Avenue with the middle part as “D’Lee-un;” but usually we just say “Ponce.”)

"Of the 9,200 multifamily units under construction [in Metro Atlanta], more than 8,000 units are located within a one-mile radius of at least one MARTA rail station or major transit hub."

Report: more transit oriented development can benefit Atlanta region | Atlanta Business Chronicle, 10/8/14

Downtown MARTA stations getting a makeover
Here’s a pic of Five Points MARTA Station in Downtown Atlanta from my morning commute. I love watching a train zoom by then seeing the people on the platform across from me. It’s a whoosh of loud, exciting speed and bright colors, contrasted with the sight of people standing around serenely.
There’s a very interesting project happening involving this station and the next one to the south of it, Garnett Station. Both are part of the Downtown South MARTA Stations Makeover, which will gather community input on “creative placemaking and ‘tactical urbanism’ enhancements” and then put the ideas into action.
If you’re in Atlanta and want to participate, the first event to gather input is on October 20 at 11:00am - 1:00pm at Five Points Station. Look for people in bright orange T-shirts that say “I Choose MARTA.”
Garnett Station (below) in particular could use some tactical TLC. It sits in the middle of south Downtown’s surface-parking blight. It would be nice to see this parking turned into transit-adjacent development some day. Until then, a spruce up for the station could be a nice way of giving people a glimpse at what the space could look like long-term with big investments.

Downtown MARTA stations getting a makeover

Here’s a pic of Five Points MARTA Station in Downtown Atlanta from my morning commute. I love watching a train zoom by then seeing the people on the platform across from me. It’s a whoosh of loud, exciting speed and bright colors, contrasted with the sight of people standing around serenely.

There’s a very interesting project happening involving this station and the next one to the south of it, Garnett Station. Both are part of the Downtown South MARTA Stations Makeover, which will gather community input on “creative placemaking and ‘tactical urbanism’ enhancements” and then put the ideas into action.

If you’re in Atlanta and want to participate, the first event to gather input is on October 20 at 11:00am - 1:00pm at Five Points Station. Look for people in bright orange T-shirts that say “I Choose MARTA.”

Garnett Station (below) in particular could use some tactical TLC. It sits in the middle of south Downtown’s surface-parking blight. It would be nice to see this parking turned into transit-adjacent development some day. Until then, a spruce up for the station could be a nice way of giving people a glimpse at what the space could look like long-term with big investments.

Waiting to cross Peachtree Street, Atlanta

Waiting to cross Peachtree Street, Atlanta

Tags: Atlanta

Where the transit-accessible jobs are in Atlanta

image

An incredible series of interactive maps from the University of Minnesota’s Accessibility Observatory site shows where the hotspots are for jobs that can be easily reached by transit and walking. They look at 46 US metro areas and judge the “30-minute accessibility values at the Census block level.”

In the above capture from the Atlanta map, the cool colors show where fewer jobs can be reached in 30 minutes, with warm colors showing the places with densities of jobs that are more walk/transit friendly. The site notes that “travel times include walking, waiting, riding, and transfers.”

Many of the hot spots in the center of the city are no-brainers for anyone who knows where the MARTA rail lines and the office clusters converge. But I was happily surprised to see those clusters of orange in the southwest end and in east Atlanta. 

The most striking thing about the image, to me, is that the findings don’t seem to have any geographic correlation to other visualizations I’ve seen, such as the Racial Dot Map, the class map, and the home values map. Accessible jobs cross over the boundaries of those geographic divisions in a fairly even way.

This seems to be one area in which the cultural and economic divides of the city don’t carry as much weight as does the built environment and zoning. Build transit lines and sidewalks, and zone for densities of commercial buildings, and the accessibility will follow.