Neglecting Sweet Auburn
Rebecca Burns has a great piece on the Atlanta Magazine website: Atlanta’s neglect of the Sweet Auburn district is a civic shame. Here’s a quote:

…image-focused Atlanta should preserve [Sweet Auburn] for the pragmatic reason Atlanta has done so many other things: the way it makes us look to the rest of the world. When those tourists who visit the King crypt and historic Ebenezer walk a few blocks west, they will see that Atlanta is treating this corner of town with neglect that is far too close to the attitudes of a century ago.

As I’ve written before, the city should be ashamed that we allowed the Interstate to slice through this historic district, cutting it’s urban fabric in half. Allowing much of the district to deteriorate the way it has is an additional wrong that needs to be righted.
Surely the city that saved the Fox Theater from the wrecking ball and prevented a freeway from plowing through Virginia Highland can get excited about preserving what remains of Sweet Auburn as well.
Photo of the Sweet Auburn YMCA building by Flickr user robbie dee
UPDATE: in the comments, Jordan has pointed out a flaw in my post. When I wrote “the city” I meant to refer to the overall Atlanta community, not the City of Atlanta government. What I want to see is the citizens of Atlanta embrace the need for preservation and revitalization here the same way they did with the Fox and Virginia Highland. 
Luckily, Councilman Kwanza Hall is speaking out about this as well.

Neglecting Sweet Auburn

Rebecca Burns has a great piece on the Atlanta Magazine website: Atlanta’s neglect of the Sweet Auburn district is a civic shame. Here’s a quote:

…image-focused Atlanta should preserve [Sweet Auburn] for the pragmatic reason Atlanta has done so many other things: the way it makes us look to the rest of the world. When those tourists who visit the King crypt and historic Ebenezer walk a few blocks west, they will see that Atlanta is treating this corner of town with neglect that is far too close to the attitudes of a century ago.

As I’ve written before, the city should be ashamed that we allowed the Interstate to slice through this historic district, cutting it’s urban fabric in half. Allowing much of the district to deteriorate the way it has is an additional wrong that needs to be righted.

Surely the city that saved the Fox Theater from the wrecking ball and prevented a freeway from plowing through Virginia Highland can get excited about preserving what remains of Sweet Auburn as well.

Photo of the Sweet Auburn YMCA building by Flickr user robbie dee

UPDATE: in the comments, Jordan has pointed out a flaw in my post. When I wrote “the city” I meant to refer to the overall Atlanta community, not the City of Atlanta government. What I want to see is the citizens of Atlanta embrace the need for preservation and revitalization here the same way they did with the Fox and Virginia Highland. 

Luckily, Councilman Kwanza Hall is speaking out about this as well.