A preview of the pop-up shops coming to Downtown Atlanta

We went to the Curb Market this Saturday to check out their preview of the pop-up shops that will be on the streetcar route this summer. It’s a nice group of local vendors, with lots of fun products, similar to what’s sold at neighborhood festivals.

Above, Stroganoff sandwich and meatball splits from the 1969 Better Homes & Gardens “Ground Meat Cookbook” — I didn’t catch the name of the shop — and 10-plagues finger puppets (!!) from Modern Tribe, a seller of fun Judaica & Jewish gifts.

The shops will be open from June 1st to August 31 in currently-empty storefronts. Read about the pop-up shops program here.

Broad Street this morning. Downtown Atlanta.

Broad Street this morning. Downtown Atlanta.

Foggy Forsyth Street, Atlanta

Foggy Forsyth Street, Atlanta

My neighborhood: Fairlie-Poplar, Downtown Atlanta

My neighborhood: Fairlie-Poplar, Downtown Atlanta

Walton Street, Downtown Atlanta, 1920
Atlanta gets criticized, rightly so, for having dropped the ball on historic preservation of architecture in the twentieth century.
But let’s take a moment to recognize this: every one of these buildings, in the above 1920 photo of Walton Street, is still standing today. In fact, the one in the foreground is being renovated and turned into a new hotel.
[The tall one in the rear is my building, the Healey; condos on top, offices and retail on the bottom (shweet).]
If historic preservation interests you, I highly suggest taking part in some of the tours for this month’s Phoenix Flies events throughout Atlanta. You can find a list of events here.

Walton Street, Downtown Atlanta, 1920

Atlanta gets criticized, rightly so, for having dropped the ball on historic preservation of architecture in the twentieth century.

But let’s take a moment to recognize this: every one of these buildings, in the above 1920 photo of Walton Street, is still standing today. In fact, the one in the foreground is being renovated and turned into a new hotel.

[The tall one in the rear is my building, the Healey; condos on top, offices and retail on the bottom (shweet).]

If historic preservation interests you, I highly suggest taking part in some of the tours for this month’s Phoenix Flies events throughout Atlanta. You can find a list of events here.

Planning group to look at South Broad Street’s challenges

The American Planning Association (APA) is coming to Atlanta in April for its 2014 conference. The conference blog has been exploring Atlanta issues — well worth a visit: http://blogs.planning.org/conference

One post announces that a workshop at the conference will look at a  troubled, historic strip of Broad Street — from Garnett Street to Alabama Street — in the middle of Downtown Atlanta. Read about it here. Here’s a quote:

Today the Broad Street corridor — accompanied by 80 acres of surface parking lots — sits right in the middle of substantial urban Atlanta energy, yet it is derelict and desolate, waiting for reinvestment.  The area is ideal for planners from across the U.S. to engage peers prior to the national conference and create a lasting impact.

I (and some others) call this stretch South Broad Street. In my opinion, this place has more unrealized potential than any other in the city. Being so well-connected to transit, with Five Points MARTA on the north side, it’s got pent-up greatness waiting inside. If you’re in the mood for a visit, I recommend Miller’s Rexall and Mammal Gallery as destinations.

And if you’d like to read some interesting history about South Broad, check out the Southbroadatl.org website.

Investor gets city’s help with turning ATL’s Flatiron into startup hub

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I’m very happy to read that an investor is getting a loan from the city’s Invest Atlanta office in order to turn the beautiful Flatiron Building in Downtown Atlanta into a startup hub. This building has been mostly empty and underused for many years and it’s great to see something finally happening.

Atlanta Business Chronicle has the story. Here’s a quote:

[Arun ] Nijhawan, a distressed real estate investor, expects to acquire the Flatiron in March and have it renovated by the end of the year…The development will include more than 36,000 square feet of collaborative workspace designed for more than 330 creatives, and design-led startups and entrepreneurs. 

Invest Atlanta will be providing a $1.5 million loan to offset the expected $10 million cost of acquisition and renovation of the building.

And did I mention this is right on the streetcar line? I didn’t? It turns out — this building (along with the hundreds of new creatives that will be inside it) is right on the streetcar line. Woot. 

Photo from Flickr user tstuckey