What good is an attractive, walkable neighborhood when it’s this painfully cold outside? Despite today’s warm-looking sunrise, it’s actually colder in Atlanta this morning than it is in Juneau, Alaska. So wrong.
But perhaps absence will make the heart grow fonder: when it warms up enough for a long walk through the city, I’ll enjoy it more than I normally would since it will follow my weather-induced, indoor seclusion.

What good is an attractive, walkable neighborhood when it’s this painfully cold outside? Despite today’s warm-looking sunrise, it’s actually colder in Atlanta this morning than it is in Juneau, Alaska. So wrong.

But perhaps absence will make the heart grow fonder: when it warms up enough for a long walk through the city, I’ll enjoy it more than I normally would since it will follow my weather-induced, indoor seclusion.

Images of The Gulch and a report on the MMPT
Blogger pecannelog shares an image comparing downtown Atlanta’s infamous Gulch with an image from a bird’s eye map showing what existed in the spot in 1871 (see the full 1871 map here). The origin of this comparison image is here.
If you don’t know, The Gulch is a mess of surface parking and general grey fields at the ground level. A series of viaducts pass above the edges of it, forming a faux ground level for some downtown buildings.
The Multimodal Passenger Terminal project is proposed for this space. Creative Loafing gave the MMPT some good coverage in a piece last year, including a look at the three alternative plans for the design of the terminal. A quote:

The project, if built, would be mammoth. Planners are envisioning retail and restaurants located inside the terminal. They anticipate having to accomodate up to 80 bus bays and five rail platforms, plus leaving room for existing and future freight rail lines that also pass through the 120-acre planning area.

The MMPT is currently undergoing a lengthy environmental-review and permitting process that may be completed as early as the spring of 2014. 
You can read about progress in the new Spring 2013 MMPT Newsletter from the Georgia Department of Transportation. According to the newsletter, alternative C is the most likely choice for build out. That’s my favorite one, because it connects directly to the nearby Five Points MARTA station.
Here’s an image of that alternative C plan, taken from the newsletter:

Any project that turns our asphalt wasteland into something useful like that is OK by me.

Images of The Gulch and a report on the MMPT

Blogger pecannelog shares an image comparing downtown Atlanta’s infamous Gulch with an image from a bird’s eye map showing what existed in the spot in 1871 (see the full 1871 map here). The origin of this comparison image is here.

If you don’t know, The Gulch is a mess of surface parking and general grey fields at the ground level. A series of viaducts pass above the edges of it, forming a faux ground level for some downtown buildings.

The Multimodal Passenger Terminal project is proposed for this space. Creative Loafing gave the MMPT some good coverage in a piece last year, including a look at the three alternative plans for the design of the terminal. A quote:

The project, if built, would be mammoth. Planners are envisioning retail and restaurants located inside the terminal. They anticipate having to accomodate up to 80 bus bays and five rail platforms, plus leaving room for existing and future freight rail lines that also pass through the 120-acre planning area.

The MMPT is currently undergoing a lengthy environmental-review and permitting process that may be completed as early as the spring of 2014. 

You can read about progress in the new Spring 2013 MMPT Newsletter from the Georgia Department of Transportation. According to the newsletter, alternative C is the most likely choice for build out. That’s my favorite one, because it connects directly to the nearby Five Points MARTA station.

Here’s an image of that alternative C plan, taken from the newsletter:

MMPT

Any project that turns our asphalt wasteland into something useful like that is OK by me.

123 Luckie Street Lofts Building, Downtown Atlanta

lindsayoberstatlanta posts a beautiful photo of the 123 Luckie building across from the Tabernacle in downtown Atlanta. One of my favorite residential buildings downtown. It was built in 2000 and does a nice job of blending in well with the older architecture of the Fairlie-Poplar district (not an easy feat).

Bring it on
From Decatur Metro comes news that the Federal Transit Administration has greenlighted (greenlit? lighted green?) the beginning of construction on the Atlanta Streetcar  project. Yay!
Very excited about this — and totally prepared to do a 180 on my excitement when construction makes navigating my downtown neighborhood a hellish freakshow of delays. That’s my right and I plan to take advantage.
Quote from the post:

…the  streetcar will spur new development in an economically distressed area.  It will also reconnect the eastern and western sections of downtown,  which have been separated since Interstate 75/85 was built in the 1950s.  Also, the project is expected to create an estimated 930 jobs during  construction and more than 5,600 jobs over the next 20 years. Service is  scheduled to begin in 2013.

Bring it on

From Decatur Metro comes news that the Federal Transit Administration has greenlighted (greenlit? lighted green?) the beginning of construction on the Atlanta Streetcar project. Yay!

Very excited about this — and totally prepared to do a 180 on my excitement when construction makes navigating my downtown neighborhood a hellish freakshow of delays. That’s my right and I plan to take advantage.

Quote from the post:

…the streetcar will spur new development in an economically distressed area. It will also reconnect the eastern and western sections of downtown, which have been separated since Interstate 75/85 was built in the 1950s. Also, the project is expected to create an estimated 930 jobs during construction and more than 5,600 jobs over the next 20 years. Service is scheduled to begin in 2013.