This is the litmus test. If you don’t like Little’s, I have no truck with you. #notruck #atlanta #cabbagetown

This is the litmus test. If you don’t like Little’s, I have no truck with you. #notruck #atlanta #cabbagetown

Cabbagetown Park

We had a nice trip to Little’s Food Store for groceries and then to the park in Cabbagetown yesterday evening. This park, with its large field and playground, is one of our favorites in Atlanta for family fun. It’s particularly nice this fall with so many big, colorful trees.

A look at the mill-village roots of Atlanta’s Cabbagetown
The Hillville, a website about urban Appalachia, takes a nice look at the Cabbagetown neighborhood of Atlanta this week. The post touches on the history of the mill that anchored the community for decades:

Jacob Elsas, a German Jewish immigrant, built the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mill in Atlanta’s east end  during a post-Reconstruction boom. He also built a small community of one- and two-story shotgun and cottage houses for the 2,500 workers, who were largely poor, rural whites from North Georgia.
Residents brought with them traditions that flavored life in the village, like hill-country cookin’. Legend has it the area got its name because so many grew cabbage in their front yards and the odor of them simmering on stove tops wafted through the air.

The piece also explores the musical heritage of Cabbagetown, a place closely associated with mountain music thanks to early resident and country legend Fiddlin’ John Carson.

…with all the transformation, Cabbagetown’s history lingers. Those who are looking can find glimpses of its mountain past in photos, festivals, architecture and stories. But it may be best memorialized in music. It was, after all, once dubbed the cradle of country.

A look at the mill-village roots of Atlanta’s Cabbagetown

The Hillville, a website about urban Appalachia, takes a nice look at the Cabbagetown neighborhood of Atlanta this week. The post touches on the history of the mill that anchored the community for decades:

Jacob Elsas, a German Jewish immigrant, built the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mill in Atlanta’s east end during a post-Reconstruction boom. He also built a small community of one- and two-story shotgun and cottage houses for the 2,500 workers, who were largely poor, rural whites from North Georgia.

Residents brought with them traditions that flavored life in the village, like hill-country cookin’. Legend has it the area got its name because so many grew cabbage in their front yards and the odor of them simmering on stove tops wafted through the air.

The piece also explores the musical heritage of Cabbagetown, a place closely associated with mountain music thanks to early resident and country legend Fiddlin’ John Carson.

…with all the transformation, Cabbagetown’s history lingers. Those who are looking can find glimpses of its mountain past in photos, festivals, architecture and stories. But it may be best memorialized in music. It was, after all, once dubbed the cradle of country.