Back home in downtown ATL after a St. Louis visit
Here’s a photo from Flickr user ifmuth of Broad Street in downtown Atlanta looking very pretty in the springtime greenery. I’m so glad to be back in my Fairlie-Poplar neighborhood.
I had a nice trip to St. Louis this past weekend and I was impressed with the downtown development there. They have an amazing amount of well-preserved old buildings and I was jealous of the wide sidewalks that covered so much of the city. There has obviously been a great deal of city investment downtown, particularly with the linear parks that lead to the Arch.
Here are some photos I took of downtown St. Louis:

There’s a lot of new residential presence and a general urban vibrancy in downtown St. Louis. I’d like to see that level of vibrancy in downtown Atlanta, particularly with some added residents.
Urban centers across the US are demonstrating that they’ve learned an important lesson: the late-20th century system of having downtowns serve primarily as an office/entertainment district for car-bound suburban dwellers is unsustainable; creating livable, walkable urban spaces is the bright future. Atlanta has a little more catching up than most when it comes to this, but we’re headed in the right direction.

Back home in downtown ATL after a St. Louis visit

Here’s a photo from Flickr user ifmuth of Broad Street in downtown Atlanta looking very pretty in the springtime greenery. I’m so glad to be back in my Fairlie-Poplar neighborhood.

I had a nice trip to St. Louis this past weekend and I was impressed with the downtown development there. They have an amazing amount of well-preserved old buildings and I was jealous of the wide sidewalks that covered so much of the city. There has obviously been a great deal of city investment downtown, particularly with the linear parks that lead to the Arch.

Here are some photos I took of downtown St. Louis:

St Louis

There’s a lot of new residential presence and a general urban vibrancy in downtown St. Louis. I’d like to see that level of vibrancy in downtown Atlanta, particularly with some added residents.

Urban centers across the US are demonstrating that they’ve learned an important lesson: the late-20th century system of having downtowns serve primarily as an office/entertainment district for car-bound suburban dwellers is unsustainable; creating livable, walkable urban spaces is the bright future. Atlanta has a little more catching up than most when it comes to this, but we’re headed in the right direction.