"For generations, government policies have been geared toward creating endless landscapes of strip malls…We have eaten up farmland and forest. We have…endangered the lives of our senior citizens. We have engineered a world where children cannot walk or bike to school without risking their lives. We have created countless places devoid of any real social value."

— Sarah Goodyear, Atlantic Cities, Debating the Root Causes of Zombie Infrastructure

The Health Threat of Car-oriented Places
massurban posts a cool article about a former CDC administrator who “has become one of the leading voices calling for better urban design for the sake of good health.”
Here’s a quote about Dr. Jackson’s epiphany while on Buford Highway:

On the side of the road he saw an elderly woman walking, bent  with a load of shopping bags. It was a blisteringly hot day, and there  was little hope that she would find public transportation.
At that moment, Dr. Jackson says, “I realized that the major threat  was how we had built America.”
…Treatments could come in the form of pills, inhalers, and insulin  shots, but real solutions had bigger implications. “More and more, I  came to the conclusion that this is about how we build the world that we  live in.”

Read the full article:America’s Health Threat: Poor Urban Design

The Health Threat of Car-oriented Places

massurban posts a cool article about a former CDC administrator who “has become one of the leading voices calling for better urban design for the sake of good health.”

Here’s a quote about Dr. Jackson’s epiphany while on Buford Highway:

On the side of the road he saw an elderly woman walking, bent with a load of shopping bags. It was a blisteringly hot day, and there was little hope that she would find public transportation.

At that moment, Dr. Jackson says, “I realized that the major threat was how we had built America.”

…Treatments could come in the form of pills, inhalers, and insulin shots, but real solutions had bigger implications. “More and more, I came to the conclusion that this is about how we build the world that we live in.”

Read the full article:
America’s Health Threat: Poor Urban Design

Atlanta Beltline part of a bold urban future for America
Salon lists the Atlanta Beltline as one of seven transformative projects that are pointing the way to a bold future for American cities.
A quote about the Beltline from the article:

…we can’t think of another urban project more inspiring and  forward-thinking. It will take years to complete, but when it’s done, a  22-mile “emerald necklace” of parks, transit and new neighborhoods will  encircle the city, built along abandoned railroad corridors.

The other projects on the list:
California’s bullet train
Boston’s public market
Seattle’s demolition of an elevated freeway
Waterfront development of the Los Angeles River
New York City’s bike share program
Chicago’s Millennium Reserve open-space project
It’s pretty cool to see Atlanta’s Beltline included in this good company. With the long timeline of the project, it can be difficult for us to step back and view the importance of the Beltline to the cause of urban livability — thankfully, the national and global press are here to help us see the big picture.
Read about it here

Atlanta Beltline part of a bold urban future for America

Salon lists the Atlanta Beltline as one of seven transformative projects that are pointing the way to a bold future for American cities.

A quote about the Beltline from the article:

…we can’t think of another urban project more inspiring and forward-thinking. It will take years to complete, but when it’s done, a 22-mile “emerald necklace” of parks, transit and new neighborhoods will encircle the city, built along abandoned railroad corridors.

The other projects on the list:

  • California’s bullet train
  • Boston’s public market
  • Seattle’s demolition of an elevated freeway
  • Waterfront development of the Los Angeles River
  • New York City’s bike share program
  • Chicago’s Millennium Reserve open-space project

It’s pretty cool to see Atlanta’s Beltline included in this good company. With the long timeline of the project, it can be difficult for us to step back and view the importance of the Beltline to the cause of urban livability — thankfully, the national and global press are here to help us see the big picture.

Read about it here

"What if catering to our youngest citizens, rather than dismissing them, would help us all live happier, healthier urban lives(?)"

— Yes to this. Empathy deserves a place in urban design. Also, the whole “people with kids belong in the ‘burbs” idea is so 1985 (and not in a hip, retro way). Here’s the source of the quote.

(via alexinsd)